Give your signals clearly and in good time. Give only the correct signals -- the three illustrated. At night or in poor visibility it may be difficult for another road user to see your signal.

Giving a signal means riding with only one hand on the handlebars. As riding one-handed is dangerous, signals should not be given for longer than necessary and sometimes it is safer not to give a signal at all.

Always complete your signal and return your hand to the handlebars before carrying out the manoeuvre -- changing direction or slowing down -- to maintain maximum control.

Left turn signal
  • Left turn signal

    This cyclist is signalling that he is going to move into the left or turn left.
    The whole of the arm and hand is extended level with the shoulder, palm facing forwards. If you give the signals in this way then it can be more easily seen and understood by other road users.

Right turn signal
  • Right turn signal

    This cyclist is signalling that he is going to move out to the right or turn right.

Slowing down signal
  • Slowing down signal

    This cyclist is signalling that he is going to slow down or stop. The arm is extended level with the shoulder, palm facing downwards. Move your arm up and down at least three times, but not too fast.

Other vehicles can give signals throughout the manoeuvre because they are using direction indicator signals or stop light signals. These signals are more easily seen by other road users.

As a cyclist you have to rely on arm signals given before the manoeuvre and your signals are not easily seen by other road users, particularly at night or in poor visibility. Before changing direction or slowing down make sure other road users have seen you and avoid abrupt changes that may bring you into conflict with them. Do not rely on your signals.

Signals by other road users

Before riding on the road, not only should you know how to give signals but you need to be able to recognize signals given by others and know what they mean. ( See pages 94 and 95 for more information on signals by drivers and riders to other road users.)