'Double white' lines are used to separate traffic travelling in opposite directions where your view of the road is limited.

illustration

Road marking

A warning arrow marked on the road will give you time to 'get over to the left' before the 'Double white' lines begin.

Road marking

If the line nearer to you is solid you must not cross or drive on the line.

Road marking

Sometimes to increase the separation of opposing streams of traffic the gap between the solid lines is widened and hatch markings are used. You must not drive on the line or enter the hatched area.

Road marking

If the line nearer to you is broken you may cross or drive on it but only if it is safe to do so.

You may cross the lines to overtake if you can do so before reaching a solid white line on your side.

Except where 'Double white' lines are used to separate traffic travelling in the same direction, you may cross 'Double white' lines to make a right turn into or out of any road or premises.

You should not stop -- not even if the broken line is on your side of the road. If there is no convenient lay-by, you may, however, stop briefly to load or unload goods or passengers.

You may cross 'Double white' lines to avoid an accident, obstruction or when directed by a Police Officer or Traffic Warden.

In busy urban areas 'Double white' lines are also used to control lane changing. If the 'Double white' lines separate two lanes for traffic travelling in the same direction, you must not cross or drive on them if the nearer of the two lines is solid.